Tuesday, August 22, 2017

#HowAdvertisingWorks (on me) – New Balance

I haven’t owned a pair of New Balance shoes since the ‘90s.  They were my starter “premium” sneakers.

Over time I traded up to “real” running shoes.  First Brooks; now Asics.  New Balance was relegated to a distant, dated, and dusty folder in my consideration set.

I recently re-experienced New Balance, by accident, when I stayed at a Westin and took advantage of the hotel’s Workout Gear Lending Program, in which they lend guests fresh, clean workout gear if you forget to pack right. I was pleasantly surprised.  They looked and felt great.  New Balance had rediscovered its design and performance mojo.

Later that same week I was out for a run when a guy blew by me (not hard to do) wearing a snazzy pair of electric blue running shoes.  Sure enough, he was wearing New Balance.  I doubt I would have registered the brand name if not for my experience at the Westin.

A few days later I noticed an ad for New Balance while flipping through Wired.  I'm quite sure that New Balance ads have been trying to get my attention for years. But its ads were invisible to me because our brain is the original spam blocker.  My first-hand experience made me notice the ad.

The insight:  If a customer knows they don't like prunes, running ads to make prunes seem hip and cool isn't likely to work.  Sampling the all-new lemon-zest prunes at my grocery store will likely be more effective.  If tasty, I may then actually notice and “consume” your ad.


When repositioning a brand, showcase new behaviors, not just new brand messages. Customers judge brands by what they do, not simply by what they say.  Create experiences that allow them to reach their own conclusion — e.g., sampling, public displays, VR experiences, trusted peer reviews.  This sets up the advertising to reinforce these newly formed perceptions. 

#HowAdvertisingWorks

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

#HowAdvertisingWorks (on me) – Range Rover Velar

I recently was flipping through Automobile Magazine and came across an article about the new Range Rover Velar. It's stunning. Hadn’t heard of it before seeing that article. Today, the Velar was in my Facebook newsfeed. Remembering the article, I clicked into the content to see a 360-degree view. The insight: Awareness leading directly to engagement, without the help of any mass advertising. Planning earned media in sync with paid media can be a strong integration. Earned media adds third-party credibility.

#HowAdvertisingWorks

Monday, August 14, 2017

#HowAdvertisingWorks (on me) – Advil Gel Minis

I’ve been fighting a cold and have been a frequent visitor to CVS.  While reaching for a box of Advil, I accidentally picked up a box of Advil Gel Minis.  Hadn’t heard anything about these mini pills, so I put them back.  I wasn’t sure it would deliver the same dosage as the regular pill.  Yesterday I was leafing through Rolling Stone and came across an ad for these Gel Minis.  My experience at CVS triggered me to take notice.  Yep, same dosage as the big capsule.  Next time I’m at CVS, I’ll get the Advil Gel Minis.

The insight:  Advertising is often actively consumed by its audience.  I notice bank ads when I'm shopping a mortgage.  Or car ads if my lease is coming due.  I noticed this Advil ad because I have a cold, and because I had a previous triggering experience.  

#HowAdvertisingWorks 

Sunday, August 13, 2017

#HowAdvertisingWorks (on me).


I’ve decided to note and document the ways in which marketing communications influences me. Some of these insights may seem simple. And in a way, that's the point.

We overthink advertising in boardrooms. We put the weight of the entire campaign on the shoulders of a single piece of content, forgetting how elements work together, and how triggers work in the customer's mind.

Stay tuned. Would enjoy hearing examples from others.  

#HowAdvertisingWorks